nat-gas-flame-8.jpg.crop_display GettyImages
ORANGE, CA - JUNE 11: Blue flames rise from the burner of a natural gas stove June 11, 2003 in Orange, California. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, testifying as an energy expert, told a U.S. House committee June 10 that high natural gas prices resulting from increased demand and shrinking domestic production are here to stay and may potentially drive U.S. industry overseas. A cold winter is being blamed for depleting wells and raising the price of natural gas to more than twice what it cost two years ago. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Twin Peaks

Natural gas consumption now peaks twice a year, according to the latest data by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Natural gas consumption now peaks twice a year, according to the latest data by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

For decades, gas use would hit a seasonal peak each winter when demand for space heating would soar.

U.S. EIA

 

Now utilities increasingly rely on natural gas to generate electricity. That has created a second gas peak in the summer, when electric utility air conditioning loads climb with the temperature.

The electric power sector became the largest user of natural gas six years ago, when it passed the industrial sector, EIA reported.

 

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish