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PRITZWALK, GERMANY - SEPTEMBER 12: A photovoltaic cell lies on a table at the Aleo factory on September 12, 2012 in Pritzwalk, Germany. Aleo, which is owned by German engineering group Bosch, is fairing better than many of its competitors but a spokesman admitted the company is also suffering from the gradual reduction of the feed-in compenstation rates set by the German government, which gurantee fixed prices for electricity delivered into the German electricity grid. Several other solar industry firms in eastern Germany, including Q.Cells, Sovello and Solarwatt AG, have gone into bankruptcy this year. Aleo mainly produces solar panels installed on the roofs of residential houses. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Texas Lights Up Solar

If you think oil when you think Texas - think again. Try thinking solar. Today, there is about 193 megawatts of large-scale solar in the state. But by 2029, that could increase to 12,500 megawatts, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the Wall Street Journal reported this week. "That is roughly equal to the size of all solar farms currently operating in the U.S.," the newspaper reported.

If you think oil when you think Texas - think again.

Try thinking solar.

Today, there is about 193 megawatts of large-scale solar in the state.

But by 2029, that could increase to 12,500 megawatts, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, the Wall Street Journal reported this week.

"That is roughly equal to the size of all solar farms currently operating in the U.S.," the newspaper reported.

Many maintain solar prices have fallen so precipitously that it is increasingly competitive with other electric power generation regardless of special government incentives.

"State incentives in California, Nevada and North Carolina helped fund the construction of many large-scale solar farms designed to sell electricity into those local power grids," the Journal reports. "But in Texas, while there is federal financial support for such projects, there are no state subsidies or mandates that encourage solar power."

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